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  1. #21
    Junior Member
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    Jan 2016
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    4
    Really nice article, thank you for the information.

  2. #22
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    8
    Fantastic article! I will definitely be using all of this information in planning my campaign.

  3. #23
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
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    14
    I really wish I had spent more time with tips like this BEFORE my campaign launched. Would have gone a long way...

  4. #24
    Kickstarter Noobie Vioectrolysis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Valparaiso, Chile
    Posts
    9
    Thank you for the lessons. Though maybe it is not too relevant but there is a problem that's caused by the sudden cancellation of a lot of successful campaigns lately,
    this regarding the "Video Game" section.

  5. #25
    Great article. I wish I paid more attention to all this before I started my own crowd-funding campaign.

  6. #26
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Boca Raton
    Posts
    50
    My experience with Kickstarter was kind of awful, but this is more because of my own personal failings and emotional hang-ups than the concept or process itself.

    I didn't do enough research up front and went into it with a set of expectations that weren't terribly realistic. As it turns out, you don't get to just record a funny homemade video and sit back to watch the money roll in. There is also NO stable of rich, lazy-but-altruistic Kickstarter supporters clicking around randomly looking for funny, cute writers with silly self-published books to give their money to... a disappointing surprise, to say the least.

    As far as I can tell, the majority of people who pledge to Kickstarter are either savvy, experienced users looking to support the projects most likely to succeed, or people who are already familiar with the individual project or its creator. This means you need to go into it well-prepared, with a highly marketable video and incentives that really sell the project. You should also be prepared to actively promote your project to your own social media base and beyond, and accept that help gladly as it comes.

    About a week into the process, I realized my mistake. My video, while honest and funny, was NOT professionally shot or marketable -- it was just me talking to the camera on my iPad, complaining about my hair, explaining my project with too many "ums" and making weird jokes about my vagina. Totally me, yes -- but not something that would be considered well-planned or well-produced by any stretch of the imagination. I also wasn't clear enough about what I wanted to do with the money ("weird, creative ideas to promote my book" wasn't good enough, it seems) and while I thought my incentives were pretty good (original drawings from the book and original poems/drawings created for pledges of $100 or more), in retrospect I should have planned these out better, too.

    The biggest (and worst) surprise for me was that nearly all of my pledges came from people I already knew, or friends of friends, and this made me HORRIBLY uncomfortable. A fund pledge from a random stranger just feels different than one from someone you know. These weren't just simple business transactions, they were shows of support by people who knew me or knew of me, and this added a whole new sense of responsibility and personal debt that I hadn't felt before. Not a reasonable reaction, I guess, but as someone who notoriously SUCKS at accepting help, a natural one.

    It became clear about halfway through that my project was destined for failure unless I stepped up and did a huge promotional blitz of everyone I knew. At this point, the death certificate practically wrote itself. Already feeling weird about the pledges I'd received from friends, there was no way I was going to take the hard sell out to the rest of my social media base. So I stopped promoting altogether, cringing when people asked me how my Kickstarter was going and waiting impatiently for it to die.

    Once it did, I was relieved -- but then I realized this thing is out there forever, a permanent testament to my failure as a self-promoter and Kickstarter savant. I can't even pretend like it never happened. The Internet says it did and the Internet never lies. Not terrific for my self-esteem, I gotta say.

    With all of this said, I still think Kickstarter is a great tool for creators to find support and funding for their worthwhile projects. They just have to be more savvy, less prone to guilt or other emotional weirdness, and better prepared than I was.

  7. #27
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    24
    Thank you for this information!

  8. #28
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    5
    Too much work to do before launch a campaign

  9. #29
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    24
    WOW!!

    This post have a lot good information.

    I have received 1.27 BTC from a one-time cost of less than $100.00 worth of Bitcoin, using a Bitcoin crowdfunding system.

    The system is amazing! People from all over the world are involved. I don`t mind to show you how to get involved, if you want to...

  10. #30
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    141
    You need to keep a couple of things in mind: 1) Know your audience. Make sure you have an existing fanbase, don’t expect Kickstarter or Indiegogo to bring the crowd to you. 2) Make sure your product, subject matter, and genre work for crowdfunding. Some things work incredibly well, are almost guaranteed to raise money. Other projects are going to be one in a million on crowdfunding.

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