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  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Sep 2016
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    193

    How can I identify a good company to invest in which have high yield potentials?

    I am an investor who is looking to invest in a company or business with high yield potentials. What are some things I should watch out for before picking a company to invest in?

  2. #2
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
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    16
    Good question.. Revenue streams, target demographic, competitors for said demographic, overhead, owner drive/ambition/track record..
    GetFire.net

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    Sep 2016
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    Will the crowdfunding platform provide all this information about this company, or will I base my research on what the company says or put out to the public?
    What if the company are just starting up with no trace of previous businesses?

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    Sep 2016
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    193
    Made my research and this is my findings.
    Ask them the following question, their answers will help you decide.
    Do you have a strong management team?
    Do your founders or investors have any “Star Power?”
    Do you need to raise more than $1 million?
    Have you developed an effective 30-second elevator pitch?
    Have you developed a 3-minute crowdfunding pitch video with a strong call-to-action?
    Have you developed a “Pitch Book” for investors?
    Do you have a lead investor of $25k+ or more?
    Have you raised at least $100,000+ or more from prior investments?
    Is your business growing at 20% or more month over month?
    Have you generated at least $100,000+ of lifetime revenue?
    Is your business projecting 2x to 3x year-on-year profit growth?
    Can you provide investors with a 3x to 10x ROI over the next 3 to 5 years?
    Is your market valuation worth $5 million or more?
    Is your market capitalization realistic from a VC’s point of view?
    Have you run a successful rewards/perks-based crowdfunding campaign?
    Do you have a database of at least 5,000+ customer email accounts?
    Do you have a database of at least 1,000+ investor email accounts?
    Have you generated at least 3 or more press articles in the trade press?
    Do you have $20,000 or more for an annual advertising/crowdfunding PR budget?
    Do you have a strong LinkedIn resume and a large social media following on Facebook and Twitter?

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    180
    .
    What most investors want:

    * Google upside potential but no risk
    * Patented product
    * Accounts receivable
    * World-class management
    * Little or no competition
    * Major OEM customer
    * A lock on the vertical

    In other words - dreamsville, which is why everybody is chasing Uber, Airbnb and Pinterest.
    .

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    Sep 2016
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    193
    Yeah. That quite true. I will check those out. maybe I will become one of the folks running after them. Thanks for sharing.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    180
    .
    Here's an interesting report:

    "178 Startup Failure Post-Mortems" http://bit.ly/2ar4hvq

    Wow - some people & and their 'hot' ideas . . . . .

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    141
    probably very difficult to determine the successful and high-potential company!
    Investors have to choose several projects possibly some will be successful!

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    193
    1. Understand that it's a numbers game. If you only invest in one company your most likely return is zero. You need a portfolio of at least ten companies and ideally > 30 companies before the portfolio math can work for you. Too few in the portfolio and you're simply hoping to get lucky.
    2. If you're an accredited investor get started by joining an angel fund in your area. Invest a small amount in the fund ($25k would be a good number) and don't do any side car investing for at least a year. Learn by actively participating in due diligence projects, opportunity screening, etc.
    3. Understand that in general the quality of opportunities will be a) deals funded in the old school private transaction method, b) crowdfunded deals that are only open to accredited investors, and c) crowdfunded deals that are open to non-accredited investors. The reason is because that’s the order from least to most hassle and cost for the company raising money.
    4. Because of #3, if you're non-accredited don't do it.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    180
    .
    "I am an investor who is looking to invest in a company or business with high yield potentials."

    'high yield' = early or risky. You're not gonna get a high yield return from a proven, profitable company. That's what _every_ investor is looking for.

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