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  1. #31
    Junior Member
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    I'd say review the business plan and ask about contingencies to mitigate risk. Basically what is the plan and what is the back up plan? In my opinion its all in the execution so the leadership must be experienced, competent and passionate.

  2. #32
    I agree with the leadership being the most important then the business plan.

  3. #33
    Senior Member
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    Sep 2016
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    What if in the case where the Company's CEO isn't known yet. Maybe a new but seem good, however, no built up reputation for himself?

  4. #34
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    Look for a rising middle class and lots of young people entering the work force. Then invest in the products they use, think toothpaste in india. Lots of high yield in emerging markets, also higher risks

  5. #35
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by tony10 View Post
    Look for a rising middle class and lots of young people entering the work force. Then invest in the products they use, think toothpaste in india. Lots of high yield in emerging markets, also higher risks
    You mean like snapchat yeah?

  6. #36
    Senior Member
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    More information to write

    Quote Originally Posted by Deepali View Post
    Better ways is to do due diligence on startup to see whether the company is worth investing or not. Visit : http://www.crowdinvest.com/blog/the-...-on-start-ups/ to better understand how it works.

    Good luck
    Good blog by the way. I had a good read.

  7. #37
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    Yield is the dividend payout divided by the share price - so your question suggests that you are an income investor.

    This puts you in a powerful position as many if not most investors look for capital appreciation (i.e. the share price goes up). If you’re a long term holder of a share looking for good yield, the share price doesn’t much concern you except at the entry price… and hence you’re competing with fewer other investors for good ideas.

    You need to look for companies that (i) have a high dividend payout and (ii) (this is important) that can sustain this payout.

    (i) is easy. yahoo, google, WSJ, FT… plenty of places to see dividend histories.

    (ii) requires a bit more work. Discard companies where the high dividend is an anomaly (share price has fallen rapidly so historic dividend payout represents a high yield, recently paid a special dividend… etc). Then look for companies that have businesses that are sustainable and defensible. Sustainable means that there will always, or at least for as long as you foresee, be demand for their products or services. Defensible means that you can identify the reasons why the company can fend off competitors (and in today’s world of disruptive tech, than can be harder).

    Then make your purchase and don’t look at it more than once a year!

    Good luck with your investing.

  8. #38
    Junior Member pro_larsen's Avatar
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    Lewes, USA
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    If the dividend yield is too good to be true, I would be suspicious of the sustainability. But the price is not that hint that will help you to evaluate future opportunities to win.
    High-yield bond portfolios concentrate on lower-quality bonds, which are riskier than those of higher-quality companies. These portfolios primarily invest in U.S. high-income debt securities where at least 65% or more of bond assets are not rated or are rated by a major agency such as Standard & Poor's or Moody's at the level of BB (considered speculative for taxable bonds) and below.
    So this is one of the most risky investments and the way to win there is to find out more about the management of a company and the prospects of its industry.

  9. #39
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    Benjamin Graham once quoted: “The individual investor should act consistently as an investor and not as a speculator.”

    Investors choose stocks based on the fundamental analysis and stay invested for long-term. They do a careful analysis of the company and then decide to invest in it. Short-term price changes do not motivate/de-motivate investors. They do not enter/exit a stock frequently. In fact, they keep their portfolio diversified to manage risk.

    On the other hand, a speculator looks to generate short-term returns, and their choice is based more on chance than analysis. They may go by historical data, rumors, tips or gut feelings & anticipate the movement in a stock's price.

    Once you make sure that you want to invest and not speculate, it’s important from an investor’s perspective to do fundamental analysis of the stocks you want to invest in.

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